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CBSE

Subject

Reading Passage

Multiple Choice Questions

1.  

In the following questions, you have six brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Every child is born, with some inherited characteristics, into a specific sociology-economic and emotional environment, and authority. I inherited honesty and self-discipline from my father: from my mother, I inherited faith in goodness and deep kindness and so did my three brothers and sister. But it was the time I spent with Jallaluddin and Samsuddin that perhaps contributed most to the uniqueness of my childhood and made all the difference in my later life. The unschooled wisdom of Jallaluddin and Samsuddin was so intuitive and responsive to non-verbal messages, that I can unhesitatingly attribute my subsequently manifested creativity to their company in my childhood.

I had three close friends in my childhood – Ramanadha Sastry, Aravindan and Sivaprakasan. All these boys were from orthodox Hindu Brahman families. As children, none of us ever felt any difference among ourselves because of our religious differences and upbringing. In fact, Ramanadha Sastry was the son of Pakshi Lakshmana Sastry, the high priest of the Rameswaram temple. Later, he took over the priesthood of the Aravindan went into the business of arranging transport for visiting pilgrims; and Sivaprakasan became a catering contractor for the Southern Railways.

Who were the speaker's close friends in his childhood?

 



    2.   You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

    Bertrand Russell in The Conquest of Happiness has said that the sole reason of unhappiness finding refuge in the heart of man is the unhindered growth of 'self-centred passions'. These passions are more often materialistic. And in the pursuit of materialistic passions, man becomes alienated from the society. Failure in his pursuit often leads him to discontentment and dejection and he finds himself a misfit in this world. In the modern world, none is unaffected by stress. The stress to outdo the other in this mad rat race of consumerism often leads to depression. Even children are not spared from this. They are supposed to fare better than their classmates in examinations and other co-circular activities. So man, right from childhood, has to face the brunt of being born in this fast changing society.

    A section of the youth, unable to cope with the expectations of their loved ones, either and their lives or experiment with drugs, for seeking temporary mental relaxation provided by the initial intake, encourages people to indulge in them more often. The body then becomes totally dependent on drugs and cannot survive without the daily dose. With regular intake the amount required to produce the effect also increases. This physical and mental dependence on drugs is called drugs addiction.

    Drug addiction is psychiatric, psychological and social problem. While persons of all ages and at all places are open to drug use the most susceptible among them are the youth. It has attained the proportions of almost an epidemic among the youth. It is mostly introduced to an unsuspecting person by his friends and is usually observed that once addicted to drugs, they initiate others to drugs. Some youngsters take to drugs because they are poked fun at if they do not use drugs. And some take drugs just to seek company or break boredom. In addition to these, other factors that lead to drug addiction are - lack of parental care and supervision, lack of moral and religious education, media and pop culture, broken homes, hatred for any authority, etc. Seeking refuge in drugs relieves tensions, eases depressions and removes inhibitions, although the period of ecstasy is apparently short-lived.

    The cycle of drug addiction involves






      3.  

      Read the following passage carefully and choose the most appropriate answer to the question out of the four alternatives.

      A classless society, however, does not mean a society without leaders. It means rather one in which every citizen becomes for the first time eligible for leadership, if he has the power to lead. It means a society in which everyone is given, as far as possible, the chance to develop this power by the widest diffusion of educational opportunities in the broadest sense, and by keeping the career wide open to talents of every useful kind. It is often said that a community of equals will not allow itself to be led. But in fact, most men are, in most things, very willing to be led, and more in danger of giving their leaders too much than too little authority, especially if they are free to choose them, and assured that the leaders cannot exploit them for personal economic advantage; leadership, so far from disappearing, will come into its own in a truly democratic society. But it is likely to be a more diffused leadership than we are used to; for a better-nurtured people will have more citizens with strong wills and minds of their own, wishful to lead; some in politics, some in industry, and some in professions and arts of life.

      This is the idea of a classless society. Some will reject it as contrary to their interest, some as utopian and against 'Human nature,' for there are some who deny, indeed if not in word, that the aim of society should be to promote the greatest happiness and welfare of the greatest number and others who hold, with pessimistic honesty, that most men must be driven and not led.

      According to the passage, a classless society is _________



        4.  

        In the following questions, you have six brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

        I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common peoples of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred. One could deduce it from general principles.

        Nearly all the sports praised nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the fun and exercise, but as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly n=mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe at any rate for short periods that running jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

        By 'concrete examples' the writer is referring to _________.




         



          5.  

          Read the following passage carefully and choose the most appropriate answer to the question out of the four alternatives.
          Implanting standards, right values, the science of good and evil are an essential part of education. Many forces thwart this to work, but two of the most serious hindrances to it are examinations and specialization. The examination system is both an opiate and a poison. It is an opiate because it lulls Man into believing that all is well when most is ill. It is a poison because it paralyses or at least slows down the natural activities of the healthy mind. Man finds himself a creature of unknown capacities in an unknown world, wants to learn what the world is like, what he should be and do in it. To help him in answering these questions is the one and only purpose of education. However, tests of progress are useful and necessary. Examinations are harmless when the examinee is indifferent to their result, but as soon as they matter, they begin to distort his attitude to education and to conceal its purpose. For disinterestedness is the essence of all good education and liberal education is impossible without it.

          One of the core elements of education is



            6.  

            You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

            Bertrand Russell in The Conquest of Happiness has said that the sole reason of unhappiness finding refuge in the heart of man is the unhindered growth of 'self-centred passions'. These passions are more often materialistic. And in the pursuit of materialistic passions, man becomes alienated from the society. Failure in his pursuit often leads him to discontentment and dejection and he finds himself a misfit in this world. In the modern world, none is unaffected by stress. The stress to outdo the other in this mad rat race of consumerism often leads to depression. Even children are not spared from this. They are supposed to fare better than their classmates in examinations and other co-circular activities. So man, right from childhood, has to face the brunt of being born in this fast changing society.

            A section of the youth, unable to cope with the expectations of their loved ones, either and their lives or experiment with drugs, for seeking temporary mental relaxation provided by the initial intake, encourages people to indulge in them more often. The body then becomes totally dependent on drugs and cannot survive without the daily dose. With regular intake the amount required to produce the effect also increases. This physical and mental dependence on drugs is called drugs addiction.

            Drug addiction is psychiatric, psychological and social problem. While persons of all ages and at all places are open to drug use the most susceptible among them are the youth. It has attained the proportions of almost an epidemic among the youth. It is mostly introduced to an unsuspecting person by his friends and is usually observed that once addicted to drugs, they initiate others to drugs. Some youngsters take to drugs because they are poked fun at if they do not use drugs. And some take drugs just to seek company or break boredom. In addition to these, other factors that lead to drug addiction are - lack of parental care and supervision, lack of moral and religious education, media and pop culture, broken homes, hatred for any authority, etc. Seeking refuge in drugs relieves tensions, eases depressions and removes inhibitions, although the period of ecstasy is apparently short-lived.

            The theme being developed by the writer is



              7.  

              Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the following question out of the four alternatives.

                                                      Cyber Bogeys

              The cyber-world is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient, sometimes, convenient because alarming. Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another and to panic-prone Indians, that a mischievous neighbor has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumors. And the Centre's automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with google, Twitter and factbook about access to information If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors that the nebulous mischief-makers of the cyber-world. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspicious websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the North- East or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressing immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship.

              It is just as absurd and part of the same syndrome, to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister's Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as misrepresenting the PMO- as if Twitterers would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO- makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief Minister of West Bengal, This is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyber - world for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite dangerously distracting.

              What is the opposite of 'wrong-headed'?



                8.  

                Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the question out of the four alternatives.

                Real policeman, both in Britain and the united state, hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV- if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them.
                The first difference is that a policeman’s real-life revolves around the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court, he has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.
                Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty -or not-of stupid, petty crimes.
                Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal: as he’s arrested, the story is over, in real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

                Which of the following statements is correct?



                  9.  

                  A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

                  Another marvel on the far side of the lake was a little farm that felt like a secret in the city. Some of the gaunt Karnataka labourers even looked away when children came to dig and eat. But the greatest pleasure, this side of the lake, was the jamun tree. A few months back, Kalu and Sunil had a feast in the branches, shaking down a few berries for Mirchi.

                  That's when they came to know the second-coolest thing about the jamun tree : There were parrots nesting in it. Since then, some other road boys had been capturing the parrots one by one to sell at the Marol Market, but Sunil had brought Kalu around to the belief that the birds should be left as they were. Sunil listened for their squawks each morning, to make sure they hadn't been abducted in the night.

                  Kalu's expertise was in the recycling bins inside airline catering compounds. Private waste collectors emptied these dumpsters on a regular basis, but Kalu had mastered the trash truck's schedules. The night before pickup, Kalu would climb over the barbed-wire fences and raid the overflowing bins.

                  Kalu's routine had become known by the local police, however. He kept getting caught, until some constables proposed a different arrangement. Kalu could keep his metal scrap if he'd pass on information he picked up on the road about local drug dealers.

                  What was the second coolest thing about the Jamun tree?



                    10.  

                    A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it.

                    Mary Garden, a noted opera singer, earned a great deal of money during her career, but was constantly bothered by the demands of her father for money – and always in large sums.
                    Miss Garden would always give it to him, though often she would often complain that his requests seemed somewhat unreasonable. To this the stock reply was that he needed the money for a very special project. She was not going to refuse her father, was she?
                    During the depression Miss Garden, like many others, lost her money in the stock market crash. Shortly afterward, her father died, and, much to her surprise, she was notified that he had left a large bank account in her name. He had saved for her every cent she had given him.
                    The demands God makes on us may seem hard at times. But all the while He is actually helping us to store up an 'eternal bank account' in heaven – one which may balance the scales in our favour when we least expect it. Troubles are often the instruments by which God fashions us for better things.

                    God at times, makes hard demands so that he............. when he least expect it.



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