Subject

English Language And Comprehension

Class

SSCCGL Class 12

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 Multiple Choice QuestionsMultiple Choice Questions

96. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark corresponding to it.

Learning is the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others, and which we can only derive at second-hand from books or other artificial sources. The knowledge of that which is before us, or about us, which appeals to our experience, passions, and pursuits, to the bosom and businesses of men, is not learning. Learning is the knowledge of that which none but the learned know. He is the most learned man who knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation. The learned man prides himself in the knowledge of names and dates, not of men or things. He thinks and cares nothing about his next-door neighbours, but he is deeply read in the tribes and castes of the Hindoos and Calmuc Tartars. He can hardly find his way into the next street, though he is acquainted with the exact dimensions of Constantinople and Pekin. He does not know whether his oldest acquaintance is a knave or a fool, but he can pronounce a pompous lecture on all the principal characters in history. He cannot tell whether an object is black or white, round or square, and yet he is a professed master of the laws of optics and rules of perspective.

Learning is defined as:
  • the knowledge of that which is before us

  • the knowledge about us

  • the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others

  • the knowledge related to the business of men


C.

the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others

49 Views

100. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark corresponding to it.

Learning is the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others, and which we can only derive at second-hand from books or other artificial sources. The knowledge of that which is before us, or about us, which appeals to our experience, passions, and pursuits, to the bosom and businesses of men, is not learning. Learning is the knowledge of that which none but the learned know. He is the most learned man who knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation. The learned man prides himself in the knowledge of names and dates, not of men or things. He thinks and cares nothing about his next-door neighbours, but he is deeply read in the tribes and castes of the Hindoos and Calmuc Tartars. He can hardly find his way into the next street, though he is acquainted with the exact dimensions of Constantinople and Peking. He does not know whether his oldest acquaintance is a knave or a fool, but he can pronounce a pompous lecture on all the principal characters in history. He cannot tell whether an object is black or white, round or square, and yet he is a professed master of the laws of optics and rules of perspective.

The given passage implies that
  • knowledge of the learned is exclusive to them

  • a learned man cannot deliver lectures

  • a learned man is not interested in Calmuc Tartars

  • a learned man is not aware of the optics and the rules of perspective


A.

knowledge of the learned is exclusive to them

30 Views

97. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark corresponding to it.

Learning is the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others, and which we can only derive at second-hand from books or other artificial sources. The knowledge of that which is before us, or about us, which appeals to our experience, passions, and pursuits, to the bosom and businesses of men, is not learning. Learning is the knowledge of that which none but the learned know. He is the most learned man who knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation. The learned man prides himself in the knowledge of names and dates, not of men or things. He thinks and cares nothing about his next-door neighbours, but he is deeply read in the tribes and castes of the Hindoos and Calmuc Tartars. He can hardly find his way into the next street, though he is acquainted with the exact dimensions of Constantinople and Peking. He does not know whether his oldest acquaintance is a knave or a fool, but he can pronounce a pompous lecture on all the principal characters in history. He cannot tell whether an object is black or white, round or square, and yet he is a professed master of the laws of optics and rules of perspective.

The most learned man is he who
  • knows about all the principal characters in history

  • sees not with the eyes of others

  • is acquainted with the streets of Constantinople and Peking

  • knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation.


D.

knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation.

29 Views

98. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark corresponding to it.

Learning is the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others, and which we can only derive at second-hand from books or other artificial sources. The knowledge of that which is before us, or about us, which appeals to our experience, passions, and pursuits, to the bosom and businesses of men, is not learning. Learning is the knowledge of that which none but the learned know. He is the most learned man who knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation. The learned man prides himself in the knowledge of names and dates, not of men or things. He thinks and cares nothing about his next-door neighbours, but he is deeply read in the tribes and castes of the Hindoos and Calmuc Tartars. He can hardly find his way into the next street, though he is acquainted with the exact dimensions of Constantinople and Peking. He does not know whether his oldest acquaintance is a knave or a fool, but he can pronounce a pompous lecture on all the principal characters in history. He cannot tell whether an object is black or white, round or square, and yet he is a professed master of the laws of optics and rules of perspective.

A learned man, as described in the passage
  • cares about men and things

  • does not care about men and things

  • cares about the shapes of objects

  • cares about his neighbours


B.

does not care about men and things

27 Views

99. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and mark corresponding to it.

Learning is the knowledge of that which is not generally known to others, and which we can only derive at second-hand from books or other artificial sources. The knowledge of that which is before us, or about us, which appeals to our experience, passions, and pursuits, to the bosom and businesses of men, is not learning. Learning is the knowledge of that which none but the learned know. He is the most learned man who knows the most of what is farthest removed from common life and actual observation. The learned man prides himself in the knowledge of names and dates, not of men or things. He thinks and cares nothing about his next-door neighbours, but he is deeply read in the tribes and castes of the Hindoos and Calmuc Tartars. He can hardly find his way into the next street, though he is acquainted with the exact dimensions of Constantinople and Peking. He does not know whether his oldest acquaintance is a knave or a fool, but he can pronounce a pompous lecture on all the principal characters in history. He cannot tell whether an object is black or white, round or square, and yet he is a professed master of the laws of optics and rules of perspective.

The passage suggests that a learned man
  • understands his neighbours

  • does not know his old acquaintances

  • is not concerned about names and dates

  • is interested in travelling


B.

does not know his old acquaintances

33 Views