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Chemistry I

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Class 10 Class 12
Draw a suitable labelled diagram to express the relationships for ideal solutions of A and B between vapour pressures and mole-fractions of components at constant temperature.

Answer:

(i) The solutions which obey Raoult’s law over the entire range of concentration are known as ideal solutions. The ideal solutions have two other important properties. The enthalpy of mixing of the pure components to form the solution is zero and the volume of mixing is also zero, i.e.,

ΔmixH = 0
ΔmixV = 0

It means that no heat is absorbed or evolved when the components are mixed. Also, the volume of solution would be equal to the sum of
volumes of the two components.



(ii) 

At molecular level, ideal behaviour of
the solutions can be explained by considering two components A and B. In pure components, the intermolecular attractive interactions will
be of types A-A and B-B, whereas in the binary solutions in addition to these two interactions, A-B type of interactions will also be present.
If the intermolecular attractive forces between the A-A and B-B are nearly equal to those between A-B, this leads to the formation of ideal
solution.
example: Solution of n-hexane and n-heptane, bromoethane and chloroethane, benzene and toluene, etc.



Escaping tendency of 'A' and 'B' should be same in pure liquids and in the solution.


Calculate the mass percentage of benzene (C6H6) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) if 22 g of benzene is dissolved in 122 g of carbon tetrachloride.

Mass % of benzene
                      = mass of benzenemass of solution ×100= 2222+122×100= 22144×100 = 15.28%
Mass% of carbon tetrachloride = 100 - 15.28
                          = 84.72%

Calculate (a) molality (b) molarity and (c) mole fraction of KI if the density of 20% (mass/mass) aqueous KI is 1.202 g mL-1.


(a) 20% (mass/mass) means that 20 g of KI is present in 80 g of water.

Therefore, Moles of KI in solution
 



moles of KI = 20/166 =0.12mol
moles of water =80/18 =4.44mol
therefore, mole fraction of KI
 
=moles of  KImoles of KI + moles of water

=0.120.12+4.44= 0.0263            

Calculate the mass of urea (NH2CONH2) required in making 2.5 kg 0.25 of molal aqueous solution.

Solution:

Molality (m) is defined as the number of moles of the solute per kilogram (kg) of the solvent and is expressed as:

= Moles of soluteMass of solvent in kg
 
Mol. mass of urea NH2CONH2
                 = 14 + 2 + 12 + 16 + 14 + 2
                 = 60 g mol-1

Molality (m) = Moles of soluteMass of solvent in kg

25 = Moles of solute2.5

or Moles of solute
                = 0.25 x 0.25 =  0.625

  Mass of urea
                   = Moles of solute x Molar mass

                   = 0.625 x 60 = 37.5 g


Calculate the mole fraction of benzene in solution containing 30% by mass in carbon tetrachloride.


Let the total mass of the solution be 100g and mass of benzene be 30 g
therefore mass of tetrachloride= (100-30)g = 70g
Molar mass of benzene,




Calculate the molarity of each of the following solution (a) 30 g of Co(NO3)2.6H2O in 4.3 L solution (b) 30 mL of 0.5 MH2SO4 diluted to 500 mL.

solution;

Molarity (M) is defined as number of moles of solute dissolved in one litre (or one cubic decimetre) of solution.


(a) Mol. mass of Co(NO3). 6H2O

               =58.9+(14+3×16)2+6(18)=58.9+(14+48)×2+108=58.9+124+108 = 290.9

Moles of Co(NO)3.6H2O
                                       =30290.9=0.103 mol.
Volume of solution = 4.3 L
Molarity, 
          M=Moles of soluteVolume of solution in litre    = 1034.3 = 0.024 M

(b) Number of moles present in 1000 ml of 0.5M H2SO4= 0.5 mol
therefore number of moles present in 30ml of 0.5M H2SO4=0.5×301000mol =0.015mol
therefore molarity =0.015/0.5L 

thus molarity is 0.03M