Subject

English Language And Comprehension

Class

SSCCGL Class 12

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 Multiple Choice QuestionsMultiple Choice Questions

97.

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary.
When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry.
Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry.
He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner.
But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

What was the fear of the writer in his childhood?

  • That his parents might drive him out of home

  • That his parents would die suddenly at night

  • That he might fail in the examinations

  • That he might be made a prisoner


B.

That his parents would die suddenly at night

31 Views

98.

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary.
When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry.
Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry.
He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner.
But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

What was the writer when he concluded that worry was useless?

  • The writer was in Asiatic Turkey

  • The writer was at home

  • The writer was on the war front in Mesopotamia

  • The writer was in prison


C.

The writer was on the war front in Mesopotamia

32 Views

100.

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary.
When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry.
Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry.
He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner.
But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

How does a cause of worry trouble us if we suppress our worry deliberately?

  • Causes of worry trouble us in various circumstances

  • Causes of worry remain in the subconscious mind and trouble us through bad dreams

  • Causes of worry cause imaginary anxiety

  • We cannot take actions cautiously and carefully


B.

Causes of worry remain in the subconscious mind and trouble us through bad dreams

34 Views

99.

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary.
When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry.
Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry.
He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner.
But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

What was the recurring nightmare of the writer after the war was over?

  • He dreamt that he was a prisoner in a war that was not going to be over

  • He dreamt that his wife was in hospital

  • He dreamt that a member of his family had a mishap

  • He dreamt that he was a prisoner of war in Asiatic Turkey


A.

He dreamt that he was a prisoner in a war that was not going to be over

33 Views

96.

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary.
When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry.
Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry.
He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner.
But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

Why was the writer able to live in jail without much worry?

  • Because nothing of his future depended on himself

  • He was comfortable in jail

  • Because he was a prisoner of war

  • Because worry is a common thing


A.

Because nothing of his future depended on himself

42 Views