Subject

English Language And Comprehension

Class

SSCCGL Class 12

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 Multiple Choice QuestionsMultiple Choice Questions

96. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more peddlers on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped giving credit to me. The boy’s method of account-keeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The boy was probably pocketing money and eating off the stuff. With my credit at the wholesalers’ gone, the public complained that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me  notice to quit. I pleaded the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, “This is what he gets for helping you! I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.”

Why does the speaker say that his sales were poor?
  • Because his cash receipts were going down.

  • Because the boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous.

  • Because the railways were admitting more pedlars on the the platform.

  • Because there were no buyers.


C.

Because the railways were admitting more pedlars on the the platform.

35 Views

97. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more peddlers on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped giving credit to me. The boy’s method of account-keeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The boy was probably pocketing money and eating off the stuff. With my credit at the wholesalers’ gone, the public complained that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me  notice to quit. I pleaded the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, “This is what he gets for helping you! I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.”

How did the boy's method of account-keeping affect the speaker?
  • His worries increased.

  • He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner.

  • His sales were poor.

  • He did not know if he was moving forward or backward.


D.

He did not know if he was moving forward or backward.

32 Views

98. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more peddlers on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped giving credit to me. The boy’s method of account-keeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The boy was probably pocketing money and eating off the stuff. With my credit at the wholesalers’ gone, the public complained that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me  notice to quit. I pleaded the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, “This is what he gets for helping you! I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.”

Why did the pubic complain?
  • Because his credit at the wholesaler's was gone.

  • Because nothing one ever wanted was available.

  • Because there were gaps on the shelves all over the shop.

  • Because the railways gave him notice to quit.


B.

Because nothing one ever wanted was available.

31 Views

99. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more peddlers on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped giving credit to me. The boy’s method of account-keeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The boy was probably pocketing money and eating off the stuff. With my credit at the wholesalers’ gone, the public complained that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me  notice to quit. I pleaded the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, “This is what he gets for helping you! I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.”

Where did the order to quit come from?
  • From the old station master

  • From high up

  • From the railway authorities

  • From the contractor


B.

From high up

30 Views

100. A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more peddlers on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped giving credit to me. The boy’s method of account-keeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The boy was probably pocketing money and eating off the stuff. With my credit at the wholesalers’ gone, the public complained that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me  notice to quit. I pleaded the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, “This is what he gets for helping you! I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.”

Why did the speaker shed tears?
  • Because he saw a new person, where he and his father had sat.

  • Because he was cut off from the railways.

  • Because he grew desperate and angry.

  • Because he slapped the boy on the cheek.


A.

Because he saw a new person, where he and his father had sat.

31 Views