Subject

English Language

Class

TET Class 12

Pre Boards

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Sample Papers

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 Multiple Choice QuestionsMultiple Choice Questions

1.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

In the mode suggested by Sir Tim, teachers may self-evaluate and self-reflect

  • using technology

  • without technology

  • through a students' survey

  • interviewing each other


A.

using technology

The paragraph says "With modern technology teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor". 


2.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

Teachers talk about teaching' means that they 

  • make some suggestions

  • discuss their own practices

  • criticize one another

  • freely change opinions


B.

discuss their own practices


3.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

A synonym for the word 'counselling', from the passage is

  • describing

  • mentoring

  • discussing

  • teaching


B.

mentoring


4.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

'Butterflies' here refer to 

  • the dress code

  • a practice of staff interaction

  • changing schools

  • going to classes in rotation


B.

a practice of staff interaction


5.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

The talk by Sir Tim is about the 

  • teachers who dress like butterflies

  • visiting schools to socialise

  • knowledge teachers gain for job growth

  • schools who control their teachers


C.

knowledge teachers gain for job growth


6.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

Here, 'visible' means

  • seen

  • obvious

  • appealing

  • bright


B.

obvious


7.

As I Watch You Grow

Do you know how much you mean to me?
As you grow into what you will be.
You came from within, from just beneath my heart
It's there you'll always be though your own life will now start.
You're growing so fast it sends me a whirl,
With misty eyes I ask, where's my little girl?
I know sometimes to you I seem harsh and so unfair,
But one day you will see, I taught you well because I care.
The next few years will so quickly fly,
With laughter and joy, mixed with a few tears to cry.
As you begin your growth to womanhood, this fact you must know,
You'll always be my source of pride, no matter where you go.
You must stand up tall and proud, within you feel no fear,
For all you dreams and goals, sit before you very near.
With God's love in your heart and the world by its tail,
You'll always be my winner and victory will prevail.
For you this poem was written, with help from above,
To tell you in a rhythm of your mother's heartfelt love!
Kay Theese

'Do you know how much you mean to me?' is a _______question.

  • rhetorical

  • restrictive 

  • convergent

  • divergent


D.

divergent

A divergent question is a question with no specific answer but rather exercises one's ability to think broadly about a certain topic.


8.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

In this extract, it is observed that technology supports teachers to

  • improve students

  • conduct meetings for teachers

  • follow up/remediation activities for students

  • self-diagnose their practices


D.

self-diagnose their practices


9.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

Rotating staff meetings in the classrooms' permits teachers to

  • be informal with each other

  • miss some of them

  • share their own practices with others

  • keep busy all the time


C.

share their own practices with others


10.

Renowned educationist Sir Tim Brighouse observed that an outstanding school has four factors that are visible. "Teachers talk about teaching, teachers observe each other's practice, teachers plan, organize and evaluate their work together rather than separately and that teachers teach each other." He continues "One of the reasons I like that is that you can immediately see ways in which you could make it more likely that teachers talk about teaching."
Sir Tim then encouraged schools to focus on activities that were low effort but high impact, describing them as 'butterflies'. Some examples he gave included rotating staff meetings around different classrooms with the host, at the start, describing the room layout and displays or discussing other teaching techniques and approaches. With modern technology, teachers could observe their own lessons and then when viewing them back, decide whether they want to share them with a mentor. The role of mentoring was vital and suggested that more schools could send teachers out in small groups to learn from colleagues in other schools.
He said "If this were widespread practice, if people were to attend to their butterflies, the outcome in terms of teacher morale and teacher satisfaction would be positive. We all agree that professional development is the vital ingredient".

'Low effort but high impact' in this context implies that schools

  • pay teachers a lower salary

  • extract more work for the same pay

  • decrease the work load and salary

  • create opportunities within the system for development


D.

create opportunities within the system for development