Subject

English Language

Class

TET Class 12

Pre Boards

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Sample Papers

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 Multiple Choice QuestionsMultiple Choice Questions

11.

If you were to ask 20 people the meaning of physical fitness, you would get 20 different answers. Fitness is all things to all people, a precious commodity which enables us to live our lives to the full yet is really cherished only when it begins to fade away. To an older person, it might be the feeling of youthful vigour, to an athlete the capacity to run a mile in four minutes, to a stenographer ability to type for eight hours at a stretch without developing aching shoulder muscles. To a coach it is something which comes with training, to a physician, it is a functional state of the body defined in technical terms.
It is all these things and more. It is strength, flexibility, ability, power, speed, and muscular and cardiovascular endurance. It is the ability to enjoy our daily lives and to achieve our goals without undue fatigue or stress. It is having a reserve of physical stamina and strength for safety and the enjoyment of leisure activities. It is protection against degenerative diseases and feeling physically youthful even when we are growing old. Fitness is active, not passive. Yet recent decades have seen a quantum leap in the number of devices which help us to avoid effort and movement, the two key ingredients in physical fitness. We can no longer take fitness for granted, as could people of an earlier era, because the automatic movements which should maintain its walking, carrying, pushing, running, jumping, digging, lifting are gradually becoming unnecessary. We don't have to get to our feet to change television programmes. It's only human to take advantage of shortcuts. But even though many of us are beginning to recognise the need to combat the rising toll of degenerative diseases and the decrease in capacity for activities which require effort, all too often we still look for a button to push. We want to get fit without having to work at it and without making changes in our lifestyles. This is not possible.

Take for granted' means

  • To value someone or something too lightly.

  • To appreciate the value of something.

  • Both (1) and (2) are correct

  • Both (1) and (2) are incorrect.


A.

To value someone or something too lightly.

'Take for granted 'is to undermine the worth of something/someone.


12.

If you were to ask 20 people the meaning of physical fitness, you would get 20 different answers. Fitness is all things to all people, a precious commodity which enables us to live our lives to the full yet is really cherished only when it begins to fade away. To an older person, it might be the feeling of youthful vigour, to an athlete the capacity to run a mile in four minutes, to a stenographer ability to type for eight hours at a stretch without developing aching shoulder muscles. To a coach it is something which comes with training, to a physician, it is a functional state of the body defined in technical terms.
It is all these things and more. It is strength, flexibility, ability, power, speed, and muscular and cardiovascular endurance. It is the ability to enjoy our daily lives and to achieve our goals without undue fatigue or stress. It is having a reserve of physical stamina and strength for safety and the enjoyment of leisure activities. It is protection against degenerative diseases and feeling physically youthful even when we are growing old. Fitness is active, not passive. Yet recent decades have seen a quantum leap in the number of devices which help us to avoid effort and movement, the two key ingredients in physical fitness. We can no longer take fitness for granted, as could people of an earlier era, because the automatic movements which should maintain its walking, carrying, pushing, running, jumping, digging, lifting are gradually becoming unnecessary. We don't have to get to our feet to change television programmes. It's only human to take advantage of shortcuts. But even though many of us are beginning to recognise the need to combat the rising toll of degenerative diseases and the decrease in capacity for activities which require effort, all too often we still look for a button to push. We want to get fit without having to work at it and without making changes in our lifestyles. This is not possible.

The statement that 'Fitness is all things to all people' implies that

  • everybody regards fitness to be the absolute good

  • everybody includes everything under the concept of fitness

  • everyone has his/her own definition of fitness

  • there is an agreed comprehensive meaning of fitness


C.

everyone has his/her own definition of fitness


13.

The gallery has over 1000 paintings. These ________ during the last 100 years.

  • have collected

  • have been collected

  • had been collected

  • had collected


B.

have been collected

'1000 paintings' is a plural subject, hence 'have been collected' is the correct answer.


14.


If you were to ask 20 people the meaning of physical fitness, you would get 20 different answers. Fitness is all things to all people, a precious commodity which enables us to live our lives to the full yet is really cherished only when it begins to fade away. To an older person, it might be the feeling of youthful vigour, to an athlete the capacity to run a mile in four minutes, to a stenographer ability to type for eight hours at a stretch without developing aching shoulder muscles. To a coach it is something which comes with training, to a physician, it is a functional state of the body defined in technical terms.
It is all these things and more. It is strength, flexibility, ability, power, speed, and muscular and cardiovascular endurance. It is the ability to enjoy our daily lives and to achieve our goals without undue fatigue or stress. It is having a reserve of physical stamina and strength for safety and the enjoyment of leisure activities. It is protection against degenerative diseases and feeling physically youthful even when we are growing old. Fitness is active, not passive. Yet recent decades have seen a quantum leap in the number of devices which help us to avoid effort and movement, the two key ingredients in physical fitness. We can no longer take fitness for granted, as could people of an earlier era, because the automatic movements which should maintain its walking, carrying, pushing, running, jumping, digging, lifting are gradually becoming unnecessary. We don't have to get to our feet to change television programmes. It's only human to take advantage of shortcuts. But even though many of us are beginning to recognise the need to combat the rising toll of degenerative diseases and the decrease in capacity for activities which require effort, all too often we still look for a button to push. We want to get fit without having to work at it and without making changes in our lifestyles. This is not possible'Fitness is active, not passive' means

  • We can take fitness for granted

  • we should avoid effort and movement

  • We can resort to shortcuts.

  • We cannot be sedentary


D.

We cannot be sedentary


15.

If you were to ask 20 people the meaning of physical fitness, you would get 20 different answers. Fitness is all things to all people, a precious commodity which enables us to live our lives to the full yet is really cherished only when it begins to fade away. To an older person, it might be the feeling of youthful vigour, to an athlete the capacity to run a mile in four minutes, to a stenographer ability to type for eight hours at a stretch without developing aching shoulder muscles. To a coach it is something which comes with training, to a physician, it is a functional state of the body defined in technical terms.
It is all these things and more. It is strength, flexibility, ability, power, speed, and muscular and cardiovascular endurance. It is the ability to enjoy our daily lives and to achieve our goals without undue fatigue or stress. It is having a reserve of physical stamina and strength for safety and the enjoyment of leisure activities. It is protection against degenerative diseases and feeling physically youthful even when we are growing old. Fitness is active, not passive. Yet recent decades have seen a quantum leap in the number of devices which help us to avoid effort and movement, the two key ingredients in physical fitness. We can no longer take fitness for granted, as could people of an earlier era, because the automatic movements which should maintain its walking, carrying, pushing, running, jumping, digging, lifting are gradually becoming unnecessary. We don't have to get to our feet to change television programmes. It's only human to take advantage of shortcuts. But even though many of us are beginning to recognise the need to combat the rising toll of degenerative diseases and the decrease in capacity for activities which require effort, all too often we still look for a button to push. We want to get fit without having to work at it and without making changes in our lifestyles. This is not possible.

(i) Recent developments have vastly decreased the need for physical effort and movement.
(ii) Resorting to shortcuts is against human nature.

  • Statement (i) is true

  • Statement (ii) is true

  • Both (i) and (ii) statements are true

  • Both (i) and (ii) statements are false


A.

Statement (i) is true


16.

If you were to ask 20 people the meaning of physical fitness, you would get 20 different answers. Fitness is all things to all people, a precious commodity which enables us to live our lives to the full yet is really cherished only when it begins to fade away. To an older person, it might be the feeling of youthful vigour, to an athlete the capacity to run a mile in four minutes, to a stenographer ability to type for eight hours at a stretch without developing aching shoulder muscles. To a coach it is something which comes with training, to a physician, it is a functional state of the body defined in technical terms.
It is all these things and more. It is strength, flexibility, ability, power, speed, and muscular and cardiovascular endurance. It is the ability to enjoy our daily lives and to achieve our goals without undue fatigue or stress. It is having a reserve of physical stamina and strength for safety and the enjoyment of leisure activities. It is protection against degenerative diseases and feeling physically youthful even when we are growing old. Fitness is active, not passive. Yet recent decades have seen a quantum leap in the number of devices which help us to avoid effort and movement, the two key ingredients in physical fitness. We can no longer take fitness for granted, as could people of an earlier era, because the automatic movements which should maintain its walking, carrying, pushing, running, jumping, digging, lifting are gradually becoming unnecessary. We don't have to get to our feet to change television programmes. It's only human to take advantage of shortcuts. But even though many of us are beginning to recognise the need to combat the rising toll of degenerative diseases and the decrease in capacity for activities which require effort, all too often we still look for a button to push. We want to get fit without having to work at it and without making changes in our lifestyles. This is not possible.

The word 'vigour' means

  • weakness

  • lethargy

  • vitality

  • frailty.


C.

vitality


17.

The board at the ration shop announced. "We have ______ rice. Wait till the next stock."

  • run down

  • run away

  • run over

  • run out of


D.

run out of

Phrasal Verb  Meaning 
run down reduce (or become reduced) in size, numbers, or resources
run away escape from a place, person, or situation
run over go over (something) quickly as a reminder or rehearsal
run out of (of a supply of something) be used up

18.

If you had worked hard, you _________.

  • will pass

  • would pass

  • would have passed

  • had been pass


C.

would have passed

If you had worked hard you would have passed shows the future certainty of action of working hard.


19.

In 2004, _______ a doctor?

  • you was

  • was you

  • were you

  • did you be


C.

were you

Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).


20.

Bread and butter _______ a wholesome food.

  • is

  • are

  • was

  • were


A.

is

When two nouns joined by ‘and’ talk about a single collective idea, we use the singular verb. Bread and butter is a wholesome food. Both covey the same idea.